Creating Healthier Communities

Choose Healthy Foods and Earn Cash Rewards!

Get More Information about the Change for Change Program

Focus on Nutrition.

The Bonner County Coalition for Health is focused on improving the health of ALL residents of Bonner County.  We believe that the entire family benefits from eating more nutritious foods.  We believe that good health for all people, no matter what their age or disease state, starts with proper nutrition.  We would like to offer help in doing so.

 

Three behaviors we feel will benefit the most people are; to eat well, to eat less and be physically active.  Many people aren’t sure how to accomplish these behaviors. On this page, you will find what we mean by “eat well” and “eat less”.  On the physical activity page, you will learn what we mean by “to be more physically active”. We hope that you will find helpful suggestions and links to other beneficial sites on these pages.

Eat Well.

Dietary Fads come and go and what they leave behind is evidence that suggests how many people benefited from trying them and how many people suffered because of following a dietary regimen. From this evidence, we have learned that those who consume a mostly plant based diet have the lowest incidence of chronic disease.

Therefore, these are our suggestions:

1

 Eat at least 2 fruits every day

2

Eat at least 3 vegetables every day

3

When you make grain choices, look for 100% whole grain (oat, wheat, rice, barley, quinoa, couscous etc.)

4

Eat ¼ - ½ c cooked legumes 2 times per week (lentils, soy, garbanzo, navy, pinto, kidney, split pea etc.)

5

Fat is a necessary nutrient so go ahead and add some fat as an accompaniment to your meals. Again, look for mostly plant based fats (Canola oil, olive oil, olives, avocados, nuts, seeds, coconut)

There are many different types of diets where people do not eat animal products or if they do only in small amounts. These can be quite healthy but “potato chip and soda diet” has no animal products and is certainly NOT healthy so please talk with a Registered Dietitian or other nutrition professional if you plan to eliminate animal products from your diet.

If you choose to consume animal products, these are our suggestions:

Eat fish 3 times per week (If you are pregnant, please speak to your doctor about how much and what kind is right for you)

Consume 2-4 servings of low fat dairy per day (1% or less milk fat)

Consume up to 3oz of lean (low fat), cooked meat protein daily

Eat all foods as close to their natural state as possible. For example, a locally grown apple with the peel remaining is a more nutritious choice than applesauce which is better than apple juice (especially if the apples used to make the juice came from another country or were blended with additional sugar to taste better).

 

Limit intake of:

  • Overly Processed Foods
  • Sugar Added Foods and Beverages
  • Trans Fats
  • White Bread/White Flour
  • Dominant Products
  • Foods or Beverages with no
  • Nutritional Value

Eat Less.

Studies of populations where they live well until the oldest age reveal the behavior of consuming the minimal number of adequate calories to sustain health. For most of us this means eating less.

Generally, we recommend:

1

Either limiting eating episodes to 3 meals and 3 snacks per day or

2

Only eating when hungry and stopping when no longer hungry (which is way before full)

3

Get educated as to how many calories are in the foods you choose to eat

4

Only eat calories that come with other nutrients so that they can be used by the body

Eat Fresh.

Where possible, choose fresh food over canned or frozen.  Better yet, grow it yourself and have a home vegetable garden.  Explore local community gardens, farmer’s markets and food cooperatives available in this community. Part of our work as a coalition has involved the creation and enhancement of community gardens. Please see the “Harvesting Our Health” button to learn where these community gardens are and how you can get involved!

Harvesting Our Health

Helpful Resources and Links for Good Nutrition

There are many resources to help you learn how to eat well, how much is the right amount FOR YOU and how your age, activity level and disease state might affect your choices. Please refer to the following resources for additional help with improving your dietary intake.

 

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

American Heart Association

Dr. Dean Ornish

Tufts Nutrition

American Diabetes Association

American Academy of Pediatrics

 

 

Affordable Healthy Food and Beverage Options

 

Fruits and Veggies MORE Matters

 

 

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

There are many different types of diets where people do not eat animal products or if they do only in small amounts. These can be quite healthy but “potato chip and soda diet” has no animal products and is certainly NOT healthy so please talk with a Registered Dietitian or other nutrition professional if you plan to eliminate animal products from your diet.

Eat all foods as close to their natural state as possible. For example, a locally grown apple with the peel remaining is a more nutritious choice than applesauce which is better than apple juice (especially if the apples used to make the juice came from another country or were blended with additional sugar to taste better).

1.
2.
3.
4.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

  • Overly Processed Foods
  • Sugar Added Foods and Beverages
  • Trans Fats
  • White Bread/White Flour
  • Dominant Products
  • Foods or Beverages with
  • no Nutritional Value
1.
2.
3.
4.